Workshop on Automotive EMCVancouver VTC Logo

Pictures of Vancouver

 

 

 

Wednesday 17 September 2014, 13:30–14:15 (Seymour Room )

J9 & J10: Workshop on Automotive EMC

Moderators:   Janet O'Neil, ETS-Lindgren, USA and David Michelson, UBC, Canada
Speakers:High-Power and High-Efficiency Wireless Power Charging System for Electric Automotive Vehicles and Electromagnetic Compatibility Design Challenges
Joungho Kim, Dept. of Electrical Engineering, KAIST, Korea
 EMC Design for Automotive Electronics
Todd H. Hubing, Clemson University, USA
 Gallium-Nitride Power Electronics for Electric Vehicle Applications
Karim Boutras, Manager, Energy Efficient Electronics, HRL Laboratories, USA
 The Increasing Need for Wireless Testing in the Automotive Industry
Garth D'Abreu, Director of RF Engineering, ETS-Lindgren, USA

 

High-Power and High-Efficiency Wireless Power Charging System for Electric Automotive Vehicles and Electromagnetic Compatibility Design Challenges

Wednesday 17 September 2014, 13:00–13:45 (Seymour Room)

Joungho Kim, Dept. of Electrical Engineering, KAIST, Korea

Wireless power transfer technologies can provide us a freedom from hardwired connectivity when using electrical powers for mobile platforms, home appliances, and automotive vehicles. Furthermore, we can reduce the cost of system power wirings, and will be able to reduce capacity and weight of batteries. Among the various wireless power transfer technologies, resonant magnetic field can offer not only the highest power transfer efficiency, but also the higher wireless transmission power in near field distance, especially for automotive wireless power charging applications. In this presentation, the basic principles of the high-power and high efficiency wireless power charging system using the magnetic field resonance will be introduced. In addition, necessary models, simulation methods, and design methodologies will be described. Also, the key design approaches including the resonant magnetic coil design, magnetic field forming, and matching techniques will be described. Finally electromagnetic compatibility issues and associated technical challenges caused by the strong high-frequency resonant magnetic fields will be presented including active and passive shielding methods.

Dr. Joungho Kim received B.S. and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering from Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea, in 1984 and 1986, respectively, and Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, in 1993. In 1996, he moved to KAIST (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology). He is currently professor in the electrical engineering department of KAIST. He is also the director of 3DIC-RC (3DIC Research Center) supported by SK Hynix Inc. and SAE-RC (Smart Automotive Electronics Research Center) supported by KET Inc. Since joining KAIST, his research centers on EMC modeling, design, and measurement methodologies of 3D IC, TSV, Interposer, System-in-Package, and multi-layer PCB. Recently, he has developed design methodologies for high-power and high-efficiency wireless power charging systems for automotive vehicles using magnetic field resonance. Dr. Joungho Kim was the conference chair of IEEE WPTC (Wireless Power Transfer Conference) 2014, held in Jeju Island, Korea. He was also the symposium chair of IEEE EDAPS Symposium 2008, and was the TPC chair of APEMC 2011. He is also an associate editor of the IEEE Transactions of Electromagnetic Compatibility. He served as a guest editor of the special issue in the IEEE Transactions of Electromagnetic Compatibility for PCB level signal integrity, power integrity, and EMI/EMC in 2010, and also as a guest editor of the special issue in the IEEE Transactions of Advanced Packaging for TSV (Through-Silicon-Via) in 2011.

EMC Design for Automotive Electronics

Wednesday 17 September 2014, 13:45–14:30 (Seymour Room)

Todd H. Hubing, Clemson University, USA

In many ways, good EMC design practices for automotive electronic systems are similar to good EMC design practices in other industries such as avionics, telecommunications and consumer electronics. However automotive systems present a unique set of EMC challenges due to their harsh electromagnetic environments, long service life, high volumes and tremendous pressure to reduce costs. In addition, a rapidly increasing number of automotive systems perform safety-critical tasks. This presentation reviews EMC design practices that are particularly important in the automotive industry. Issues of related to the design and modeling of infotainment systems, engine and transmission control systems, crash avoidance systems and high voltage power inverters are discussed.

Dr. Todd H. Hubing is the Michelin Professor of Vehicle Electronic Systems Integration at Clemson University and Director of the Clemson Vehicular Electronics Laboratory (CVEL). His research focuses on the design of electronic components and systems that work safely and reliably in automotive environments. He holds a BSEE degree from MIT, an MSEE degree from Purdue University and a Ph.D. from North Carolina State University. He was an engineer with IBM for seven years and a faculty member at the University of Missouri-Rolla for 17 years before joining Clemson University in 2006. At Clemson, he teaches classes in vehicle electronics, electromagnetic compatibility and digital signal integrity. He is a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), a Fellow of the Applied Computational Electromagnetics Society, and a Past-President of the IEEE Electromagnetic Compatibility Society.

Gallium-Nitride Power Electronics for Electric Vehicle Applications

Wednesday 17 September 2014, 15:00–15:45 (Seymour Room)

Karim Boutras, Manager, Energy Efficient Electronics, HRL Laboratories, USA

Rapid adoption of electric vehicles will benefit from new, game changing technologies, which enable smaller, lighter, and more efficient electric power management systems. Existing power electronics using silicon are approaching their maximum theoretical performance, and use bulky components, which limit the size and weight of the circuit. Gallium-Nitride (GaN) based power electronics offer 10-fold improvement of the cost-performance of present day systems. In this talk we will review HRL’s normally-off GaN-on-Si switch technology and integrated low-inductance packaging, which has been demonstrated in the lab at kW powers, with high efficiency. We will benchmark our technology against present and next generation power switches and use the example of a battery charger to demonstrate the value proposition of GaN in electric vehicles.

Dr. Karim S. Boutros is the manager of the Energy Efficient Electronics Department at HRL Laboratories. He joined HRL in 2008 to lead the development of Gallium Nitride Power Electronics. Prior to HRL he was a Senior Scientist at Teledyne Scientific. He has more than 17 years of experience in microelectronic devices, and has held multiple technical roles spanning material growth, device engineering and processing, as well technical program management. He is one of the pioneering researchers in the field of Wide-bandgap Electronics as applied to power electronics. Dr. Boutros received his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from North Carolina State University in 1996. He is a Senior Member of the IEEE and has coauthored over 75 technical publications and 10 patents.

The Increasing Need for Wireless Testing in the Automotive Industry

Wednesday 17 September 2014, 15:45–16:30 (Seymour Room)

Garth D'Abreu, Director of RF Engineering, ETS-Lindgren, USA

The long established automotive industry has been experiencing a transition from the traditional immunity and emission measurements required for certification, to the increasing implementation of new tests traditionally associated with measuring the performance of wireless devices and antennas. This trend is ongoing and so far has seen the introduction of standardized tests intended to verify that vehicle operation is not affected by the on board communication. We will look at some of the existing test facility types in common use and some of the options for building dual purpose or combination chambers to satisfy both test types

Mr. Garth D'Abreu is the Director of RF Engineering at ETS-Lindgren based at the corporate office in Cedar Park, Texas. He has primary responsibility for the design and development functions within the Systems Engineering group. The Systems group provides technical support for ETS-Lindgren worldwide and is directly responsible for anechoic chamber, E-Field generator, TEM device and instrumentation system design and development. Mr. D'Abreu is the lead engineer for reverberation chamber design and test and is responsible for the development of GTEM cells, EMP protection applications and wireless device test systems. He also provides technical support to the Filter department. He holds a BSc degree in Electronics & Communications Engineering, from North London University, UK. He is a member of the IEEE EMC Society, and active participant in standards development with has over 20 years of experience in the RF industry.

About Us | Site Map | Contact Us | ©2017 IEEE Vehicular Technology Society |