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Monday 07 September 2015, 14:00–15:30 (Burroughs Conference Level)

5G-PPP METIS-II: Key aspects of 5G RAN design

Moderator:   Patrick Marsch, Nokia Networks
Panelists:Ömer Bulakci, Huawei
 Icaro da Silva, Ericsson
 Tod Sizer, Alcatel-Lucent
 Maziar Nekovee, Samsung

 

Monday 07 September 2015, 16:00–17:30 (Burroughs Conference Level)

Next generation mobile networks

Organizers:   Haris Gacanin, Alcatel-Lucent and Preben Mogensen, Nokia
Presenters:Customer Experience Management in 5G
Haris Gačanin, Alcatel-Lucent
 Air interface evolution towards 5G
Klaus Pedersen, Nokia
 Towards Sustainable 5G Networks: Vision and Design principles for New Horizons
Ömer Bulakci, Huawei

 

Tuesday 08 September 2015, 11:00–12:30 (Burroughs Conference Level)

5G architectures

Moderator:   Simone Redana, Nokia Networks
Panelists:Naseem Khan, Verizon
 Reinaldo A. Valenzuela, Alcatel-Lucent Bell Labs
 Andrew Clegg, Google
 Andy Lippman, MIT Media Lab

 

Tuesday 08 September 2015, 14:00–15:30 (Burroughs Conference Level)

5G Challenges: Spectrum, Technology and Regulation

Organizer:   Monisha Ghosh, University of Chicago
Presenters:Challenges for 5G IoT Air Interface System Design
Gilles Charbit, MediaTek
 An Overview of 5G Requirements and Candidate Technologies
Ashwin Sampath, Qualcomm
 5G Physical Layer: Opportunities and Challenges
Reinaldo Valenzuela, Bell Labs
 5G: What to expect and where to start?
Frederick Vook, Nokia
 How public policy shapes 5G
Sharon Gillett, Microsoft

 

Tuesday 08 September 2015, 16:00–17:30 (Burroughs Conference Level)

Enabling technologies for wireless communications

Organizer:   Jose Fridman, Qualcomm
Presenters:WiFi, telephony and vehicles
Mayan Moudgill, Optimus
 Wideband transceiver technology
Chris Mayer, Analog Devices
 Software-Defined Engineering
Otto Fonseca, TELUS
 The Next Generation of Connectivity
Jose Fridman, Qualcomm

 

Wednesday 09 September 2015, 11:00–12:30 (Burroughs Conference Level)

Autonomous Vehicles

Organizer:   John Estrada, eTrans Systems
Presenters:Automated Parking Meets Self-Driving
Amin Taleb, Valeo
 Truck Automation: Challenges and Opportunities
Mohammad Poorsartep, Texas A&M Transportation Research Institute
 Autonomous Vehicles - Where we are and Where We Are Heading
John Estrada, eTrans Systems

 

Wednesday 09 September 2015, 14:00–15:30 (Burroughs Conference Level)

Connected vehicles

Organizer:   John Estrada, eTrans Systems
Presenters:Cooperative Connected Vehicles
Radovan Miucic, Honda
 Future of Transportation - The Emerging Technology Landscape
Andy Palanisamy, Leidos
 V2I and Other Extensions to Connected Vehicle Technology
John Estrada, eTrans Systems

 

Wednesday 09 September 2015, 16:00–17:30 (Burroughs Conference Level)

Enabling technologies for automotive

Organizer:   Patrick Riehl, MediaTek
Presenters:New Digital Bus Architecture for Audio Systems
Kenneth Waurin, Analog Devices
 Cutting the Cord on Electric Vehicle Charging
Grant Reig, Witricity

 

5G-PPP METIS-II: Key aspects of 5G RAN design

Monday 07 September 2015, 14:00–15:30 (Burroughs Conference Level)

It is a common understanding that the 5th generation of cellular communications (5G) will not only address the communication needs for humans beyond 2020, but also the very diverse needs of massive and mission-critical machine-type communications. A lot of research has already been conducted in the past years to determine the key technology components to address these novel and diverse requirements, yielding the consensus that there cannot be a “one-size-fits-all” approach, but that 5G will rather consist of an integration of evolved legacy and novel radio technologies that will jointly provide the needed versatility, scalability and efficiency to address the 5G requirements. However, there is still the need for substantial consensus-building on key design aspects related e.g. to the overall 5G radio access network (RAN), in particular as 5G standardization is expected to start with first study items in 3GPP already in 2016. This panel is organized by the 5G-PPP project METIS-II, which has the objective to provide a comprehensive and detailed 5G RAN design for an efficient start of 5G standardization, and will address the most controversially discussed aspects related to 5G RAN design, e.g. 1) how a reasonable and meaningful subset of 5G functionality can already be standardized in 3GPP Rel. 14, in order to enable early 5G roll-outs in 2020, without limiting the longer-term potential of 5G, 2) to which extent novel air interfaces introduced in 5G can be scalable to different needs and carrier frequencies, and how these will divide the overall requirements space among themselves, 3) what the role of evolved legacy radio interface technology (e.g. LTE-A) will be in the 5G era, and 4) which precise trade-off between flexibility and complexity should be chosen for 5G, for instance considering RAN virtualization?

Patrick Marsch, Nokia Networks (Moderator)

Dr. Patrick Marsch received his Dipl.-Ing. and Dr.-Ing. degrees from Technische Universität Dresden, Germany, in 2004 and 2010, respectively. He was the technical project coordinator of the project EASY-C, where the world’s largest early research test beds for LTE-Advanced were established. After heading a research group at TU Dresden, Germany, he is now leading a radio research department within Nokia Networks, Wrocław, Poland. He has (co-)authored 50+ journal and conference papers, has received four best paper awards, been editor of or contributor to several books and has been awarded the Philipp Reis Prize for pioneering research in the field of Coordinated Multi-Point (CoMP). Patrick is the technical manager of the 5G-PPP project METIS-II.

Ömer Bulakci, Huawei

Ömer Bulakci received the B.Sc. degree in electrical and electronics engineering from Middle East Technical University, Turkey, in 2006, M.Sc. degree in communications engineering from Technical University of Munich, Germany in 2008, and the doctoral degree in communications engineering from Aalto University, Finland, in 2013. From 2009 to 2012, he worked on multihop relay networks including LTE-Advanced standardization at Nokia Siemens Networks, Germany, in support of his doctorate studies. Since October 2012, he has been contributing to EU 5G flagship projects METIS and METIS II at Huawei Technologies ERC, Germany. He is an author or a coauthor of 40+ publications and is an inventor of 10+ patent applications. His research interests include dynamic network topology and system design of 5G networks. He is currently leading the agile resource management framework in METIS II.

Icaro da Silva, Ericsson

Icaro da Silva is a research engineer currently driving activities in the context of 5G RAN evolution at Ericsson, mainly focusing in 5G architecture topics. He is also leading the overall 5G control plane design in METIS-II. Icaro has received his M.Sc. in telecommunications engineering from the Federal University of Ceará (UFC), Fortaleza, Brazil, in 2009. During his thesis work, Icaro worked with advanced receivers and physical layer design for LTE-Advanced jointly with the Radio Access Technology department, at Ericsson Research. In 2010, he joined the Wireless Access Networks department, at Ericsson Research, Stockholm, and has since been working on concept development and prototyping in the areas of network management (OSS/BSS), data analytics for telecom applications, self-organising networks and protocol architectures for radio access networks. His main contributions are related to RAN1/RAN2/RAN3/SA5 topics of LTE/LTE-Advanced standardization holding several patents and publications.

Tod Sizer, Alcatel-Lucent

Dr. Theodore(Tod) Sizer is Vice President of the Wireless Research Program in Bell Laboratories. In this role he leads teams in six worldwide locations innovating in all aspects of wireless systems, technology and software. In addition his teams collaborate with fixed access systems including copper, and optical with special opportunities being explored at the convergence between these and wireless. Recently he has had significant impact as a key proponent and inventor of the lightRadio and small cell technology and systems leading to Alcatel-Lucent's product line solution to address the current Wireless Data explosion.During his tenure at Bell Labs he has performed research in Wired and Wireless Home Networking, Fixed Wireless Loop systems, Video Watermarking technologies, Optical Computing and Switching Systems, and High Power Laser Design. He was a member of the technical team in Lucent's role as a promoter in the Bluetooth Special Interest Group (SIG). His responsibilities in the SIG included being Chair of the Coexistence Working Group. Tod graduated from Amherst College, Magna Cum Laude and received his Masters and Doctorate from the Institute of Optics at the University of Rochester. In 2007 Tod was named a Bell Labs Fellow 'For sustained creative contributions to wireless systems, particularly in the convergence of packet and wireless technologies'. He is the author of 51 US patents, over 50 refereed publications and is a member of the IEEE and OSA.

Maziar Nekovee, Samsung

Dr. Maziar Nekovee is a Group Leader and Chief Engineer at Samsung Electronics R&D Institute UK (SRUK) where he leads Samsung's European Research in 5G, including Samsung's overall involvement in the Horizon 2020 5G PPP projects mmMAGIC, METIS-II and FANTASTIC-5G. He is also an elected member of the EU's 5G Infrastructure Association, where he contributes on behalf of Samsung to 5G vision, spectrum and pre-standards working groups. Prior to joining Samsung in 2013 he was from 2001 with BT (British Telecom) where he pioneered and led research in cognitive radio and dynamic spectrum sharing technologies, with applications to rural broadband and M2M/IoT, and provided technical consultancy to business units on wireless strategy and 4G spectrum auction. Maziar had a PhD in physics and a first degree and MSc in Electrical Engineering (cum laude) both obtained in the Netherlands. He has received a number of prestigious awards for his contributions to research in mobile communications , including Samsung DMC R&D's Best Research Practice Award in 2015, BT's Innovation Award in 2011 and the Royal Society (UK Academy of Science) Industry Fellowship in 2005. He is the author of over 90 peer-reviewed papers, 1 book and has a number of patents in telecommunication technologies.

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Next generation mobile networks

Monday 07 September 2015, 16:00–17:30 (Burroughs Conference Level)

This session will give an overview of possible research directions related to next-generation mobile communication networks, also known as 5G. The following three main topics will be in focus: (i) Air interface evolution and possible key components, including discussion of the need for a highly flexible air interface to meet diverse service requirements. (ii) Advanced costumer experience management, including requirements for access technology (technologies) to provide seamless customer experience with respect to network (access), device and service requirements. (iii) Software defined 5G networks, including the most important enabling technologies, leveraging Software Defined Networking (SDN), Network Functions Virtualization (NFV) and Mobile Edge Computing (MEC).

Haris Gacanin, Alcatel-Lucent and Preben Mogensen, Nokia (Organizers)

Haris Gačanin, Alcatel-Lucent

Customer Experience Management in 5G
In the last few years it was advocated that mobile customers in 4G expect to be "connected" at all time and at any place. However, this time we have to be more precise. Today's requirements from the customers perspective are much more demanding. They expect to have a guaranteed "service quality" or "quality of experience" at all time, at any place (indoor or outdoor) and through different devices. This sets a challenging requirement on the next-generation (name it 5G) access technology (technologies) to provide seamless customer experience with respect to network (access), device and service requirements. What we expect from 5G innovations will enhance new services and enrich our societies beyond what we experience today. It is evident that management paradigm needs to be changed.

Haris Gačanin received Dipl.-Ing. degree in Electrical engineering from University of Sarajevo in 2000. He received M.E.E. and Ph.D from Tohoku University, Japan, in 2005 and 2008, respectively. Since April 2008 until May 2010 he has been working first as Japan Society for Promotion of Science (JSPS) postdoctoral research fellow and then as an Assistant Professor at Tohoku University. He is currently working as Research Director in Alcatel-Lucent Bell in Belgium. He is senior member of IEEE and IEICE. He is a recipient of the 2013 Alcatel-Lucent Award of Excellence and the 2010 KDDI Foundation Research Award.

Klaus Pedersen, Nokia

Air interface evolution towards 5G
In this talk we start with 5G radio requirements and use cases, including an overview of the possible spectrum opportunities. The evolution towards a new 5G air interface design is afterwards discussed, elaborating on the possible key components and their pros and cons. Among others, the need for a highly flexible air interface to meet diverse service requirements, as well as adaptation in coherence with the radio environment, is motivated. The evolution of LTE-Advanced to support higher bandwidth, increased spectral efficiency, shorter latency, and new use cases is also addressed. The talk is closed with an outline of possibilities for introducing state-of-the-art 5G air interface innovations.

Klaus I. Pedersen received his M.Sc. E.E. and Ph.D. degrees in 1996 and 2000, respectively, from Aalborg University, Denmark. He is currently with Nokia Networks in Aalborg, where he is a senior wireless network specialist. His current work is related to 5G air interface and system design. He is the author/coauthor of more than hundred peer-reviewed publications on a wide range of topics. He is appointed as apart-time professor at Aalborg University in the Wireless Communications Networks (WCN) section.

Ömer Bulakci, Huawei

Towards Sustainable 5G Networks: Vision and Design principles for New Horizons
The speech introduces the main challenges for enabling the 5G vision along with the associated opportunities and research directions. We will also touch upon our multitenant network and services vision and the most important 5G enabling technologies, leveraging Software Defined Networking (SDN) and Network Functions Virtualization (NFV) as a means to embrace the vertical industries as new horizons. Conclusions are drawn on the main research, innovation and standardization activities towards the IMT for 2020 and beyond.

Ömer Bulakci received the B.Sc. degree in electrical and electronics engineering from Middle East Technical University, Turkey, in 2006, M.Sc. degree in communications engineering from Technical University of Munich, Germany in 2008, and the doctoral degree in communications engineering from Aalto University, Finland, in 2013. From 2009 to 2012, he worked on multihop relay networks including LTE-Advanced standardization at Nokia Siemens Networks, Germany, in support of his doctorate studies. Since October 2012, he has been contributing to EU 5G flagship projects METIS and METIS II at Huawei Technologies ERC, Germany. He is an author or a coauthor of 40+ publications and is an inventor of 10+ patent applications. His research interests include dynamic network topology and system design of 5G networks. He is currently leading the agile resource management framework in METIS II.

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5G architectures

Tuesday 08 September 2015, 11:00–12:30 (Burroughs Conference Level)

Mobile networks have become the main communication vehicle for the upcoming connected society. In addition to humans, billions of machines will be connected to the network in the future, yielding a 10.000 traffic increase beyond 2020. However, such traffic increase does not necessarily lead to a similar increase in the revenue of mobile network operators, which need to make very high investments to handle all this traffic. This challenges the deployment of a mobile network that can satisfy the requirements of the society and at the same time is sustainable for network operators. A fundamental piece to address this challenge is the design of a novel mobile network architecture that provides the necessary flexibility to offer new services in an efficient way and inherently can share or distribute infrastructure resources dynamically, such that operators can increase their revenue through the new services, while leveraging the efficiency of the architecture to do so in a cost-effective way. Current mobile networks are not well suited to address the above challenge. In 4G mobile networks, large effort was made in making the air interface fully adaptive to changing radio conditions, but lack similar functionality to optimize the network side. Eventually, while current architectures have been very successful in the last few years, they do not provide the required flexibility to cope with the service and traffic diversity required by 5G mobile networks as well as the current trends in terms of topologies. Such trends (in terms of traffic and topologies) make networks increasingly heterogeneous and require tailored solutions to adapt to each specific scenario and service in an efficient way. In order to overcome the limitations of today's networks, the central goal of this panel is to discuss about future mobile network architectures that can flexibly adapt its operation to the specific characteristics and requirements of a given service and scenario.

Simone Redana, Nokia Networks (Moderator)

Simone Redana received the MSc and Ph.D. degrees from the Politecnico di Milano, Milan, Italy, in 2002 and 2005 respectively. In 2006, he joined Siemens Communication in Milan, which merged with Nokia Networks in 2007 to become Nokia Siemens Networks, Nokia Solutions and Networks in 2013 and Nokia Networks in 2014. Since 2008, he has been with Nokia in Germany, where he is currently Radio Research Manager and Leader of the Radio Systems team in Munich. Simone contributed to the relay concept design in the EU project WINNER II and the Eureka Celtic project WINNER+ as well as he led the work package on advanced relay concept design in the EU project ARTIST4G. He contributed to the business case analysis of relay deployments and to the standardization of Relays for Long-Term Evolution (LTE) Release 10. He led research and standardization projects on Self-Organizing Network (SON) for LTE Release 11. His current research interests are on novel architecture solutions for 5G era, where he is coordinating the H2020 5G NORMA project.

Naseem Khan, Verizon

Naseem Khan is currently involved with the wireless standardization, strategy, and architecture activities at Verizon focusing on 5G, software-defined networks, network function virtualization, M2M, mobile core, and CPE. His work experience includes: virtualization of wireless networks, network convergence, policy control/QoS, 3GPP IMS/VoLTE, IPTV, FTTP, and network performance, reliability, and management. He has led technology planning, evaluation and implementation, industry partnerships and RFP initiatives. He has served on a number of standards committees and boards in leadership roles. Previously, he held management and senior technical positions at companies including AT&T/Lucent Bell Labs and Motorola. He holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science, and MS and BS in Electrical Engineering, and has received numerous awards including Verizon's Telecom Leaders Circle and Multiservice Forum's Senior Fellow.

Reinaldo A. Valenzuela, Alcatel-Lucent Bell Labs

Reinaldo A. Valenzuela: Fellow IEEE. IEEE Eric E. Sumner Award. Bell Labs Fellow. WWRF Fellow, 2014 IEEE CTTC Technical Achievement Award, 2015 IEEE VTS Avant Garde Award. B.Sc. U. of Chile, Ph.D. Imperial College. Director, Wireless Communications Research Department, Distinguished Member of Technical Staff, Bell Laboratories. Engaged in propagation measurements and models, MIMO/space time systems achieving high capacities using transmit and receive antenna arrays, HetNets, small cells and next generation air interface techniques and architectures. He has published 190 papers and 44 patents. He has over 22,000 Google Scholar citations and is a 'Highly Cited Author' In Thomson ISI and a Fulbright Senior Specialist.

Andrew Clegg, Google

Andrew Clegg is the Spectrum Engineering Lead for Google. He is presently focused primarily on identifying spectrum sharing opportunities for commercial wireless networks. Prior to joining Google, he served as the spectrum manager for the U.S. National Science Foundation. At NSF, he founded the Enhancing Access to the Radio Spectrum (EARS) program, a funding program dedicated to supporting academic and small business research focused on improving spectrum efficiency and access. Prior to NSF, he was a Lead Member of Technical Staff at what is now AT&T Mobility. He has over 25 years experience in national and international spectrum management for both government and commercial applications, and was a member of the U.S. delegation to two World Radiocommunication Conferences.

Andy Lippman, MIT Media Lab

Andy Lippman has a BSEE and MS from MIT and a PhD in Electrical Engineer from EPFL. In the 1980s he developed maps that we know about today as Google's streetview. He helped pioneer visual computing and communications systems such as MPEG and digital HDTV. He formed the Media Lab's Digital Life Program that engages 15 researchers and 45 companies in the invention and development of technologies and applications for human creativity and learning. He is also the co-principal investigator of the MIT Communications Futures Program. More recently, he has created the Viral Communications research group at the lab to explore how to design grassroots technologies and ideas that can scale without bound. Some work of this group addressed cooperative mesh radio networks that were used as the design basis in the One Laptop Per Child program. His current work is focused on the development of technologies and social structures for media, collaboration, and learning that challenge existing, conventional institutions.

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5G Challenges: Spectrum, Technology and Regulation

Tuesday 08 September 2015, 14:00–15:30 (Burroughs Conference Level)

There has been tremendous interest in the wireless industry and academia over the last few years to begin the process of defining requirements and technologies for the next generation of cellular systems, 5G, expected to be deployed around 2020. The requirements of 5G have to meet the projected demands of 2020 and beyond: higher traffic volumes, higher date-rates, larger number of devices, lower latencies, improved energy efficiency and lower cost: in short, orders of magnitude improvement on all key metrics. This panel will explore certain key areas that need to be investigated in order to make 5G a reality: (a) New spectrum: how key is allocation of new spectrum above 24 GHz? (b) New technologies: massive MIMO, new waveforms, beamforming etc. (c) Need for harmonized worldwide regulations

Monisha Ghosh, University of Chicago (Organizer)

Monisha Ghosh is currently a Principal Engineer at Interdigital, researching wireless technologies for 5G cellular and next generation Wi-Fi systems. Prior to this, she worked at Philips Research, Briarcliff Manor, and Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, on various communication systems such as the HDTV broadcast standard, cable standardization and on cognitive radio for the TV White Spaces, and briefly in clinical informatics. She has been an active contributor to many industry standards and was recognized with a Certificate of Appreciation for her outstanding contributions to IEEE 802.22. Her research interests are broadly in the area of signal processing and communications. She received her Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Southern California in 1991, and her B. Tech from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur in 1986. She is a Fellow of the IEEE.

Gilles Charbit, MediaTek

Challenges for 5G IoT Air Interface System Design
Air interface system design for Internet of Things (IoT) in 5G network will present a number of challenges. Flexible support of sub-systems re-using the same spectrum resources will be needed to meet the specific requirements of mobile broadband and IoT services with massive number of connections or very low latency. Optimization of the Physical (PHY) and Medium Access Control (MAC) layers specific to each of these subsystems while maximizing synergies for the system design to allow harmonious co-existence over the air interface will be important considerations.

Dr Gilles Charbit graduated at the “Grande Ecole National Supérieur de L’électronique et Applications (ENSEA, France)” and received the Ph.D. degree in Radio Communications at Lancaster University (England). He is currently a Distinguished member of technical staff in Chief Technical Office (CTO), Advanced Communication Team (ACT) , MediaTek, Cambridge, UK. Prior to joining MediaTek, he worked for Renesas Mobile Europe, Nokia Mobile Phones, Nokia Networks, and NEC. He has over 20 years of experience in 2G/3G/4G/4G evolution cellular system design and analysis, algorithm development, physical-layer modeling and simulations. He was standards delegate in ETSI SMG1 GPRS group and has attended 3GPP RAN1, RAN Plenary, SA1 standards meetings and Next Generation Mobile Network (NGMN) on behalf of MediaTek. He has over 30 patents issued in the US and more than 10 journal and conference paper publications. His current research interests are in the areas of 5G and Internet of things (IoT).

Ashwin Sampath, Qualcomm

An Overview of 5G Requirements and Candidate Technologies
Recently, there has been a surge in activity regarding 5G. This talk will provide an overview of emerging high-level requirements for 5G and associated enabling technologies. Qualcomm's view is that scalability and adaptability would be critical for 5G design, as it would need to address a wide range of services from enhanced mobile broadband, to wide area IoE, to increased-reliability use cases. Furthermore, there is a need for a unified air-interface design to meet those diverse needs while exploiting resources from multiple bands, both licensed and unlicensed. The talk will conclude with a deeper look at channel measurements and design challenges for millimeter wave bands.

Ashwin Sampath is Senior Director of Technology at Corporate R&D, Qualcomm, NJ. He is leading millimeter wave research within the division, overseeing channel measurements/modeling, system design, standardization and prototyping. He has been with Qualcomm, CR&D since 2005 where he has led projects related to dense small-cell networks, topics in LTE-Advanced, 3G/4G multi-mode wireless modem design for small-cell ASICs and Femto cell SoC architecture. Prior to joining Qualcomm, from 2003-2005, he was with Texas Instruments, leading HSDPA systems engineering for a mobile SoC and before that, was Distinguished Member of Technical Staff at Bell Labs from 1997-2003. He has over 90 issued patents. He holds a PhD in Electrical Engineering from Rutgers University.

Reinaldo Valenzuela, Bell Labs

5G Physical Layer: Opportunities and Challenges
The insatiable demand for media rich content and the increasing availability of advanced devices such as smart phones, tablets, etc., is forcing the mobile communications eco system to start in earnest to consider the next generation solutions to address these needs. Some of the options being mentioned as ingredients for such 5th Generation mobile radio systems include Small Cells, HetNets, Carrier Aggregation, Machine-to-Machine, Internet-of-Things, Relays, Device-to-Device and operation in the millimeter wave spectrum range, among others. In this talk, I will review some of the background trends driving the evolution of broadband wireless access that will impact the technology choices beyond 2020. Then, I will consider in some detail some of the most intriguing options service providers may consider.

Fellow IEEE. IEEE Eric E. Sumner Award. Bell Labs Fellow. 2014 IEEE CTTC Technical Achievement Award, 2015 IEEE VTS Avant Garde Award. B.Sc. U. of Chile, Ph.D. Imperial College. Director, Wireless Communications Research Department, Distinguished Member of Technical Staff, Bell Laboratories. Engaged in propagation measurements and models, MIMO/space time systems achieving high capacities using transmit and receive antenna arrays, HetNets, small cells and next generation air interface techniques and architectures. He has published 190 papers and 44 patents. He has over 22,000 Google Scholar citations and is a 'Highly Cited Author' In Thomson ISI and a Fulbright Senior Specialist.

Frederick Vook, Nokia

5G: What to expect and where to start?
Wireless data traffic is projected to skyrocket more than 10,000 fold beyond 2020 due to increased usage of smart-phones, tablets, new wireless devices, and IoT. The 5G research have just started and the industry is starting to come together with a complete view of the key requirements for a new technology generation. In this talk, we will present an overview of 5G technology covering 3-100 GHz band with emphasis on 5G requirements, spectrum considerations, propagation and channel modeling, air-interface and multi-antenna design. We will also briefly discuss the standards and commercialization timeline of next generation wireless systems. Finally, we conclude with the vision that 5G technology will provide a scalable service experience everywhere and anytime where people and machines will enjoy virtual zero latency gigabit experience when and where it matters.

Frederick W. Vook (SM'04) received the B.S. degree from Syracuse University in 1987 and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from The Ohio State University in 1989 and 1992, respectively, all in electrical engineering. From 1992 to 1995, he was with the Motorola Wireless Data Group where he worked on 19 GHz and 2.4 GHz propagation modeling and air-interface design for Motorola's wireless LAN products. From 1995 to 2008, he was with Motorola Laboratories, where he worked on MIMO, beamforming, and air interface design for broadband mobile communication systems. From 2008-2011, he was with Motorola Home & Networks Mobility where he worked on physical layer modeling and MIMO techniques for IEEE 802.16/WiMAX and LTE Rel-8-10. Since 2011, he has been with the North American Radio Systems Research Group, Technology and Innovation Office, Nokia, Arlington Heights, IL, where his current work involves advanced antenna array solutions for LTE and 5G cellular systems.

Sharon Gillett, Microsoft

How public policy shapes 5G
The search is on for new markets and business models for 5G wireless, including connected cars, Internet of Things, and other new services that mobile operators or equipment vendors might provide. Which models will emerge is not just a technical question. This talk will cover how the spectrum, competition and net neutrality policies that regulators adopt worldwide will shape what new models will emerge, by determining what spectrum can be used for 5G networks, how intense competitive pressure is likely to be in different parts of the world, and whether certain business models will be on or off the table.

Sharon Gillett has been dedicated to expanding the reach of connected computing ever since her first job writing software for the ARPANET, a precursor to the Internet. At Microsoft, she focuses primarily on connectivity strategy and policy. Prior to joining Microsoft, she was Chief of the Wireline Competition Bureau at the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC), where she led staff work on network neutrality and accomplished significant reforms to support broadband Internet access through the Universal Service Fund. Previously, Sharon served as the first Commissioner of Telecommunications and Cable for Massachusetts, and the first Director of the Massachusetts Broadband Institute. She was a Principal Research Associate at MIT where she researched and taught communications policy and directed an industry partnership program. Sharon earned an MBA (Sloan) and an MS in Technology and Policy from MIT, and an AB in Physics from Harvard.

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Enabling technologies for wireless communications

Tuesday 08 September 2015, 16:00–17:30 (Burroughs Conference Level)

Mayan Moudgill, Optimus

WiFi, telephony and vehicles
Using WiFi for telephony from a moving vehicle is an interesting problem. We will examine some of the engineering challenges that will need to be overcome, and suggest approaches to overcoming them.

Dr. Mayan Moudgill has worked extensively across multiple areas of computer technology, ranging from microprocessor design to enterprise software stacks. He has published extensively and holds numerous patents in areas including digital circuits, system simulation, signal processing algorithms, and compilers. He is currently CTO of Optimum Semiconductors. Previously, he has worked at Goldman-Sachs, Sandbridge Technologies, and IBM T.J. Watson Research Center. He holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Cornell University.

Chris Mayer, Analog Devices

Wideband transceiver technology
Wideband transceivers can now be effectively implemented on bulk CMOS processes. With the advantages of mainstream digital technology come the challenges of implementing high performance analog circuits using lower voltage and non-linear transistors. Analog Devices' AD9370 employs a large variety of calibrations to attain high performance and standards adherence. An overview of the transceiver design with highlights on a few of the internal calibrations is presented, with discussion on how we abstract the underlying complexity to allow our customers to achieve robust and rapid system design using our parts.

Chris started at ADI in 1994, working on audio codecs. In 1999, he switched to DSP processor design on the AD219X and Blackfin projects. After a decade of processor design, Chris switched into the RF wideband transceiver product line, working on the AD9361, AD9368/9, and successive transceiver products. Working in close collaboration with the analog designers, Chris architects, designs, verifies, & tests the digital portions of our transceivers, including the processor subsystems, and especially the calibrations which function across both digital and analog realms. Previously, Chris attended MIT (MSEE 1991) and worked at Digital Equipment Corporation on Alpha processor design verification.

Otto Fonseca, TELUS

Software-Defined Engineering
As the world increasingly transforms into a software-dominated space, the role of engineering is questioned by the uncertainty in delineating software functions and the thorough engineering of the systems they support. The previous debates about engineers expanding from building bridges, railroads and planes that physically connect the world into building telecommunication networks that virtually connect it in real time, seem now outdated with the new threat of engineering-role confusion and the argument of skills and knowledge brought unnecessary by increasing automation and simplification. We will discuss from both a technological and an organizational viewpoint, the role of engineering in Software-Defined Industries and the evolution of the profession to answer the challenges of our modern world.

Otto Fonseca is the national Director of Core Networks Planning and Engineering at TELUS, the second largest Canadian wireless carrier, which offers products and services including LTE, HSPA, HSIA, mobile/fixed IP TV, and health solutions. An M.Eng (McGill) MBA (UBC) he leads several platforms from both the technical and financial standpoint. His teams span the national wireless IMS/LTE/HSPA core, wireline core voice, video and audio conferencing, IP voice, microwave, e911, and number planning. Mr. Fonseca has primed engineering projects such as the early introduction of small cells in Vancouver's Financial District, the automatic RAN optimization of TELUS' national HSPA overlay and the Agile optimization of the wireless core for real-time IP services. He is currently developing Engineering and business models for Agile Integration of new M2M, RTC and SDN business opportunities, through Systems Engineering, risk bundling and economies of scope. His academic experience includes authoring three IEEE conference papers and award-winning projects in statistical modelling, machine learning, robotics and biomedical engineering.

Jose Fridman, Qualcomm

The Next Generation of Connectivity
Generational shifts in technology capture the imagination and offer the opportunity to push the envelope and do things in entirely new ways. The story of 5G is no different; it will be a transformational force that enables new services, connects new industries, and empowers new user experiences for the next decade — and beyond. 5G promises to deliver much more than just higher data rates and
more capacity. It targets new kinds of ultra-reliable, mission critical services. In this presentation we will outline Qualcomm’s approach to 5G, which enables the foundation of a new user-centric design that can scale and adapt to billions of connected things, provide new ways of connecting everything, and enhance cost and energy efficiency.

Jose Fridman is a Senior Director of Technology with Qualcomm, in Boxborough MA, where he is leading the development of modem technology for wireless handsets. Prior to his tenure at Qualcomm, Jose was with Analog Devices, Inc., developing platforms for wireless handsets and was the architect for the Blackfin and TigerSHARC DSPs. He holds 20 patents and 6 pending in DSP and modem design. Jose received a Ph.D. degree in EE from Northeastern University, and lives in Newton, MA with his wife and two children. He may be reached at jfridman@qti.qualcomm.com.

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Autonomous Vehicles

Wednesday 09 September 2015, 11:00–12:30 (Burroughs Conference Level)

Amin Taleb, Valeo

Automated Parking Meets Self-Driving
Park Assist systems based on ultrasonic technology are on the market for more than 20 years and have almost become a standard feature. The launch of the semi-automatic Park Assist in 2007 marked the rise of automated parking. By now fully automatic systems are available. The development is aiming towards completely self-parking cars. In parallel, the industry is seeing an unprecendeted development effort of self-driving cars with high degree of autonomy, where such automated driving vehicles can operate in highways and city driving. Valeo has demonstrated both self-parking and automated driving cars in recent years. From ADAS standpoint, these demos were relying on similar key sensor technologies.

Dr. Amine Taleb is the Manager of Advanced Projects for Valeo's Comfort and Driving Assistance (CDA) Business Group in North America. In this role, he leads the advanced engineering in ADAS applications, including Active Safety and Automated Driving/Parking, Connectivity, and Intuitive Controls for the North American Market. Prior to joining Valeo's CDA Business Group, he held several technical leadership positions at various automotive innovation suppliers in the area of advanced lighting, active safety and smart sensing devices. He has more than 20 years of experience in advanced technologies with technical expertise in the opto-electronic field. Dr. Taleb graduated from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Mich. with a doctorate degree in Physical Chemistry. As a 16-year member of Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), he has been published several times, and most recently on camera monitoring systems. Dr. Taleb has also contributed as invited speaker, panelist, and SAE technical publications reviewer around ADAS topics. Valeo is an automotive supplier, partner to all automakers worldwide. As a technology company, Valeo proposes innovative products and systems contributing to the reduction of CO2 emissions and to the development of intuitive driving. In 2014, the Group generated sales of €12.7 billion ($16.7 billion) and invested over 10 percent of its original equipment sales in research and development. Valeo has 133 production sites, 50 research and development centers and 15 distribution platforms and employs 78,500 people in 29 countries throughout the world. Valeo is listed on the Paris Stock Exchange and is a member of the CAC 40 index.

Mohammad Poorsartep, Texas A&M Transportation Research Institute

Truck Automation: Challenges and Opportunities
There major incentives for the trucking industry to adopt and implement automation. This presentation explores current and future challenges and opportunities in truck automation

Mohammad Poorsartep is a Research Scientist at the Texas A&M Transportation Research Institute where he also serves as Project Manager for TTI's Connected Transportation Initiative. In his current position, he is leading TTI's activities further into the emerging area of automated and autonomous vehicles technology. Mr. Poorsartep has an extensive background in working with construction, telecommunications, automotive, and defense industries. Prior to his current position, he spent more than four years at University of Michigan as a project manager where he led the activities of the Connected Vehicle Proving Center (CVPC) in conducting research projects sponsored by automotive manufacturers and suppliers, government agencies, and other entities. Mr. Poorsartep has been involved with several national and is an active member of industry groups such as Society of Automotive Engineers, AUVSI, and ITS America, setting standards and guidelines for testing and operation of connected and automated vehicles.

John Estrada, eTrans Systems

Autonomous Vehicles - Where we are and Where We Are Heading
The transportation and automobile industries are poised to make tremendous changes in the coming years. Through technology advances these changes will have more impact on the transportation industry than anything since Henry Ford's introduction of the Model T. This presentation will discuss where things stand today, what's driving this happening and where are things headed.

Mr. Estrada is the Founder and CEO of eTrans Systems. He is the Chairman of the Board for Driverless Transportation - a leading industry trade journal. He has 30 years experience in software development management and in the development and growth of startup businesses. eTrans Systems was launched in 2014 specifically to provide software solutions using Connected Vehicle Technology. eTrans has been working as part of the DOT's Connected Vehicle Test-bed for over a year and is currently developing both V2V and V2I applications. Driverless Transportation is an industry trade journal which is monitors and reports on the Autonomous technologies. Mr. Estrada has a BS in Computer Science and BA in Economics from Virginia Tech.

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Connected vehicles

Wednesday 09 September 2015, 14:00–15:30 (Burroughs Conference Level)

Radovan Miucic, Honda

Cooperative Connected Vehicles
Vehicle to vehicle communications, namely DSRC, is one of the driving forces behind innovations in the future automotive safety systems. USDOT, automotive industry and our suppliers have spent years in research and development and we are finally at door steps of introducing this technology into production. The technology has been tested in various field trials, pilots and model deployments. Cooperative safety applications such as Intersection Movement Assist, Emergency Electronic Brake Light, and Forward Collision Warning have potential to reduce number of vehicle to vehicle accident related fatalities. Honda is working on expanding vehicle to vehicle safety benefit and is currently researching vehicle to motorcycle and vehicle to pedestrian cooperative safety applications addressing the recent rise in percentage of fatalities of the vulnerable road users. Some challenges remain to be perfected such as positioning in deep urban areas, scalability, security and privacy but we are confident that the future will bring better days for the transportation safety.

Dr. Miucic is a Research Engineer at Honda R&D Americas, Inc.. Radovan Miucic received the B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in computer engineering from Wayne State University, Detroit MI, in 2001, 2002 and 2009, respectively. He worked as embedded software engineer (2001-2007), working for Visteon, Delphi and Siemens. He joined Honda R&D Americas, Inc. in 2007, as a Research Engineer in the ITS Group. He is also Adjunct Professor of Electrical Engineering at Wayne State University from 2012. He represented Honda in various U.S. Department of Transportation sponsored projects: Vehicle Infrastructure Integration (2007-2008), within Vehicle Safety Communication (VSC) consortium: VSC-Applications (2008-2009), VSC-Interoperability (2010-2014), and VSC- Security (2013-2015). His previous research interest was in optimization of in-vehicle networks and embedded software architecture. His current research is in wireless congestion control, performance of vehicular networks, security and privacy, and development of cooperative safety applications.

Andy Palanisamy, Leidos

Future of Transportation - The Emerging Technology Landscape
The presentation will offer a 360degree perspective on the emerging transportation technology landscape - from connected vehicles to fully automated vehicles - and how the various forces are shaping this industry. The presentation will address a variety of issues such as demographic trends, technical and policy challenges, changing attitudes of the public, market/economic forces, ridesharing and electrification, etc. and how they influence the automobile industry globally.

Andy Palanisamy is a seasoned transportation technology, communications, and policy professional with nearly 14 years of experience in the intelligent transportation systems industry. Andy has led and supported his team on various technical activities and communications programs/projects at the USDOT for over a past decade and is currently leading Leidos' outreach and communications activities associated with the USDOT Connected Vehicle Test Bed. In addition, Andy is also responsible for leading the outreach and communications activities carried out by the Federal Highway Administration's Office of Operations Research and Saxton Transportation Operations Laboratory. He is an avid blogger and has written extensively on transportation technologies, offering his perspective gained from his work in support of the USDOT's Intelligent Transportation Systems Joint Program Office (ITS JPO). Andy has built an extensive network among the industry stakeholders and is well recognized for his ability to organize and deliver meetings and workshops. He has an excellent track record in the areas of program management, strategic communications and public engagement. Andy holds a Bachelor degree in Civil Engineering and completed Master degree courses in Civil Engineering at West Virginia University. At present, he is on a sabbatical, pursuing a Master Degree in Public Administration (MPA) at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government.

John Estrada, eTrans Systems

V2I and Other Extensions to Connected Vehicle Technology
The government has announced it will require Connected Vehicle/DSRC technology in all new vehicles in the not too distant future. The driving factor in this decision and the use of the technology is its ability to reduce accidents and roadway deaths through V2V (Vehicle-to-Vehicle) safety messages. While the most critical set of applications, these safety applications are just a small part of the overall application set that is envisioned. Many of these applications involve connecting vehicles to infrastructure (V2I). This presentation will explore various options that are currently being explored and the benefits from V2I applications.

John Estrada is the Founder and CEO of eTrans Systems. He has 30 years experience in software development management and in the development and growth of startup businesses. eTrans Systems was launched in 2014 specifically to provide software solutions using Connected Vehicle Technology. eTrans has been working as part of the DOT's Connected Vehicle Test-bed for over a year and is currently developing both V2V and V2I applications. Mr. Estrada has a BS in Computer Science and BA in Economics from Virginia Tech.

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Enabling technologies for automotive

Wednesday 09 September 2015, 16:00–17:30 (Burroughs Conference Level)

Kenneth Waurin, Analog Devices

New Digital Bus Architecture for Audio Systems
Car manufacturers strive to make future generations of vehicles safer, smarter and more fuel efficient than their predecessors. Reducing the weight of existing cable harnesses - that may weigh hundreds of pounds - can lead to significant improvements in fuel efficiency. The Automotive Audio BusTM (or A2BTM) is an innovative technology from Analog Devices that reduces system cost, weight, and design complexity by distributing audio and control data, together with clock & power over a single, low-cost, unshielded twisted pair cable where connector size is minimized. The A2B technology is targeted for emerging, wiring-intensive applications such as Active Noise Cancellation, In-Car Communications, and Distributed Audio.

Ken Waurin is a Strategic Marketing Manager responsible for the Automotive Infotainment Business at Analog Devices. He has over 25 years of experience in the semiconductor industry, starting in design & field applications engineering and moving into product development, business development, and marketing after joining ADI in 1996. Ken holds a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering and Masters in Business Administration.

Grant Reig, Witricity

Cutting the Cord on Electric Vehicle Charging
Recent advancements in wireless power transmission, particularly the introduction of resonance, has cleared a path for the introduction of wireless charging systems for electric and hybrid vehicles which offer an improved user experience, increased safety and security and comparable charging efficiencies to wired chargers. During this panel, WiTricity will discuss the basics of magnetic resonance, a high level system overview of an automotive wireless charging system and cover a range of application examples including vehicle ground clearances, charge rates and other system attributes.

Grant Reig is a Senior Product Manager at WiTricity where he is responsible for defining and driving the product strategy and direction of the automotive, consumer and other WiTricity product lines. Reig joined the company in early 2014 from Olympus where he served as the Executive Director of Product Management for the global NDT product group. He has held multiple product management positions throughout his career across a wide range of disciplines successfully launching products into new and developed markets. Reig holds a High Tech MBA from Northeastern University and a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering from Bucknell University.

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