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Tutorials offered at VTC2012-Fall

All tutorials will be held on Monday 3 September 2012.

  Tutorial Name Presented by Time Room
T1Mobile Radio Channel Sounding, Data Analysis, & Radio Channel ModellingRobert Bultitude (CRC, Canada), Sana Salous (U. Durham, UK)09:00–12:30TBA
T2The Art of Mobile Radio Channel ModellingMatthias Paetzold (University of Agder, Norway)13:30–17:00TBA
T12Mobile Radio Channel Sounding, Measured Data Analysis, and Channel ModellingRobert Bultitude (CRC, Canada), Sana Salous (U. Durham, UK), Matthias Paetzold (U. Agder, Norway)09:00–17:00TBA
T3Cooperative CommunicationsLajos Hanzo (U. Southampton)09:00–12:30TBA
T4Cognitive Radio and Software Defined RadioHuseyin Arslan (U. South Florida)13:30–17:00TBA
T5Stochastic Geometry and Random Graphs for the Modeling, Analysis, and Design of Wireless NetworksMartin Haenggi (University of Notre Dame)09:00–12:30TBA
T6Cross-Layer Design for Spectrum- and Energy-Efficient Wireless NetworksGuowang Miao (KTH) and Jens Zander (KTH)13:30–17:00TBA
T7Voice over LTEK. Daniel Wong (Daniel Wireless LLC, Palo Alto), Vijay Varma (Applied Comm. Sciences, Red Bank, NJ)CANCELLED
T8V2V Safety Communications: An Overview and Examination of Technical ChallengesJohn B. Kenney and Gaurav Bansal (Toyota InfoTechnology Center)CANCELLED
T9Economic modeling for novel spectrum management approaches: secondary markets and private commonsLuis Guijarro (Universitat Politecnica de Valencia, Spain)CANCELLED

 

 

T1: Mobile Radio Channel Sounding, Data Analysis, & Radio Channel Modelling
Presented by: Robert Bultitude (CRC, Canada), Sana Salous (U. Durham, UK)
Time: 09:00–12:30
Room: TBA

 

Abstract
This tutorial begins with an overview by Dr. Bultitude of channel sounding basics. This will be followed by an outline of best practices for the analysis of channel sounding data and statistical channel modelling. If time permits, an introduction to more advanced work in the area of double directional channel sounding and spatial channel modelling will also be given. Professor Salous will discuss passive and active measurement techniques using both standard test equipment and custom designed radio channel sounders. Part I of the tutorial will end with the presentation of examples showing measured data, and results from the analysis thereof.

Tutorial Objectives
Understand channel sounding methods, equipment, and procedures
Understand measurement constraints, calibration requirements and measurement error
Appreciate difficulties and understand procedures used to analyse sounding data

Tutorial Outline

    Modelling Radio channels as linear filters (static and time-varying)
    Channel sounding to estimate impulse response function [PN, and Swept Freq]
    Applications for Results:
    Data collection (snapshot) triggering:
      Time based
      Distance based
    Analysis of Measured Data
      Estimation of Impulse Response Functions
      Estimation of Static rms Delay Spreads
      Selection of Appropriate Intervals for Time Series Analysis
      Extraction of Narrowband Fading Time Series from Impulse Response estimates
      Estimation of Doppler and Doppler Spread Functions and Parameters
      Angle of Arrival Estimation
      Angle of Departure Estimation
      Estimating Spatial Correlations from AOA and AOD information
    Reporting of Results
    Application Examples

Primary Audience
Students, professors, post-docs, and practicing engineers & scientists entering, working in, or conducting research in the field and/or systems engineers who use the results from such work and are seeking better knowledge of how information and models of importance to them are compiled, associated errors and uncertainties, and examples of how selected results can be applied.

Novelty
To impart knowledge of the foundations, methods, best practices and approaches to radio channel sounding, data analysis, and characterisation. Also, to disseminate results on current research activities in the field of mobile radio.

Biography

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T2: The Art of Mobile Radio Channel Modelling
Presented by: Matthias Paetzold (University of Agder, Norway)
Time: 13:30–17:00
Room: TBA

 

Abstract
(This tutorial corresponds to Part II of T12)
This tutorial provides a comprehensive overview of the modelling, analysis, and simulation of mobile radio channels. It offers a detailed understanding of fundamental issues and examines state-of-the-art techniques in mobile radio channel modelling.
Important classes of mobile fading channels will be presented, including terrestrial and satellite channels, various types of wideband channels, advanced MIMO channels, mobile-to-mobile channels, vehicle-to-vehicle channels, and channel models for cooperative communication systems. The tutorial strives for providing a fundamental understanding of many issues currently being investigated in the field.

Tutorial Objectives
Provide the mathematical framework for the modelling, analysis, and simulation of mobile radio channels;
Get a sound understanding of the theory behind channel modelling and simulation;
Discuss various methodologies and principles of mobile radio channel modelling;
Become aware of the importance of the temporal, frequency, and spatial correlation properties of mobile radio channels;
Learn state-of-the-art techniques for the design and parametrisation of channel simulators with given temporal, frequency, and spatial correlation properties;
Gather a broad overview of various types of mobile radio channel models;
Understand the impact of fading, multipath propagation, and noise on the performance of mobile communication systems;
Get the skills one needs to understand, to analyse, and to solve open problems in the area of mobile radio channel modelling;
Acquire sufficient competence in applying the gathered knowledge on the development of new channel models for specific propagation environments.

Tutorial Outline

    Introduction and basic principles of mobile radio channel modelling
    Explanation of different channel modelling methodologies, such as geometrical-based and measurement-based channel modelling concepts
    Examination of general channel modelling principles starting from geometrical models over reference models up to simulation models
    Discussion of various methods for the modelling of given Doppler, delay, and angular profiles
    Presentation of various classes of wideband and narrowband mobile radio channels
    Elaboration on the modelling and simulation of space-time-frequency MIMO channels
    Description of mobile-to-mobile and vehicle-to-vehicle MIMO channels
    Exploration of mobile radio channels for cooperative networks, including double Rayleigh and double Rice channels
    Providing an overview of standardized channel models.

Primary Audience
PhD students, professors, post-docs, and practicing engineers & scientists entering, working in, or conducting research in the field. Systems engineers who have a natural interest in the results from such work and/or are seeking better knowledge of how information and models of importance to them can be compiled, associated errors and uncertainties can be avoided, and examples of how selected results can be applied.

Novelty
To impart knowledge of the foundations, methods, best practices, and approaches to radio channel modelling and simulation, allowing others to appreciate and question assumptions associated with mobile radio channels. Also, to disseminate results on current research activities in the field of mobile radio channel modelling and simulation.

Biography
Matthias Paetzold, Dipl.-Ing. and Dr.-Ing., El. Eng.,1985 and 1989 (Ruhr University Bochum), received the habil. degree in Communications Engineering (Technical University of Hamburg-Hamburg) in 1998. From 1990 to 1992, he was with ANT Nachrichtentechnik GmbH, Backnang, where he was engaged in digital satellite communications. From 1992 to 2001, he was with the Department of Digital Networks at the Technical University Hamburg-Harburg. In 2001, he joined the University of Agder, Grimstad, Norway, where he is a full professor for Mobile Communications and the Head of the Mobile Communications Group. Matthias is a Senior Member of the IEEE.

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T12: Mobile Radio Channel Sounding, Measured Data Analysis, and Channel Modelling
Presented by: Robert Bultitude (CRC, Canada), Sana Salous (U. Durham, UK), Matthias Paetzold (U. Agder, Norway)
Time: 09:00–17:00
Room: TBA

 

Abstract
This tutorial will be presented in two half-day parts, neither of which is pre-requisite for the other.
Part I, presented by Professor Sana Salous and Dr. Robert Bultitude begins with an overview by Dr. Bultitude of channel sounding basics. This will be followed by an outline of best practices for the analysis of channel sounding data. If time permits, an introduction to more advanced work in the area of double directional channel sounding and spatial channel modelling will also be given. Professor Salous will discuss passive and active measurement techniques using both standard test equipment and custom designed radio channel sounders. Part I of the tutorial will end with the presentation of examples showing measured data, and results from the analysis thereof.
Part II, presented by Professor Matthias Paetzold, provides a comprehensive overview of advanced channel modelling and simulation techniques, offering a detailed understanding of fundamental issues and state-of-the-art concepts. Specific topics include the basic principles of mobile radio channel modelling and an explanation of different channel modelling methodologies. An introduction to the design of geometry-based and measurement-based channel simulators will be given. General methods for the modelling of Doppler, delay, and angular profiles will also be discussed. Part II contains a presentation of important classes of mobile fading channels, including space-time-frequency MIMO channels, and ends with a discussion of vehicle-to-vehicle channels and double Rice/Rayleigh channels for cooperative systems.

Tutorial Objectives
Understand channel sounding methods, equipment, and procedures
Understand measurement constraints, calibration requirements and measurement error
Appreciate difficulties and understand procedures used to analyse sounding data
Differentiate among and choose channel models and modelling approaches for different propagation scenarios and different applications
Understand the foundations and limitations associated with standard channel models

Tutorial Outline

    The representation of radio channels as linear filters
    Approaches for measurements to estimate channel model parameters
    Measurement system design and calibration
    Estimation and verification of parameters from the analysis of measured data
    Design and development of models from theory and from channel sounding results
    Design of sum-of-sinusoids and sum-of-cisoids channel simulators
    Modelling of Doppler, delay, and angular profiles with symmetrical/asymmetrical shapes
    Modelling and simulation of space-time-frequency MIMO channels
    Development of vehicle-to-vehicle and cooperative channel models

Primary Audience
PhD students, professors, post-docs, and practicing engineers & scientists entering, working in, or conducting research in the field. Systems engineers who have a natural interest in the results from such work and/or are seeking better knowledge of how information and models of importance to them can be compiled, associated errors and uncertainties can be avoided, and examples of how selected results can be applied.

Novelty
To impart knowledge of the foundations, methods, best practices and approaches to radio channel sounding, data analysis, characterisation, and modelling, allowing others to appreciate and question assumptions associated with mobile radio channels. Also, to disseminate results on current research activities in the field of mobile radio channel modelling and simulation.

Biography

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T3: Cooperative Communications
Presented by: Lajos Hanzo (U. Southampton)
Time: 09:00–12:30
Room: TBA

 

Abstract
This overview introduces the principles of cooperative communication,
commencing with the introduction of the basic MIMO types of

1. Beamforming;

2. Space-time coding;

3. Spatial Division Myltiplexing;

4. Spatial Division Multiple Access;

The limitations of MIMOs relying on co-located array-elements are
highlighted and it is shown, how the single-antenna-aided cooperative mobiles may circumvent these limitations by forming MIMOs having distributed elements. This concept is also referred to a Virtual Antenna Arrays (VAA). Then the corresponding amplify-forward and decode-forward protocols as well as their hybrids are studied. Channel coding has to be specifically designed for the VAAs in order to prevent avalanche-like error-propagation. Hence sophisticated three-stage-concatenated iterative channel coding schemes are proposed and it is argued that in the absence of accurate channel information at the relays the best way forward might be to use multiple-symbol differential detection. Indeed, it is rather unrealistic to expect that an altrustically relaying handset would also accurately estimate the source-relay channel for the sake of high-integrity coherent detection. EXIT-chart-aided designs are used for creating near-capacity solutions and a range of future research directions as well as open problems are stated.

Tutorial Objectives
Decide upon the AF versus DF design benefits;
Resolve the coherent versus non-coherent cooperation dilemma;
Engage in research on novel cooperative solutions for wireless systems;

Tutorial Outline

    Cooperative Adaptive Modulation
    Successive Relaying Aided Near-Capacity Irregular Distributed Space-Time Coding;
    Coherent versus Non-Coherent Detection
    Resource-Optimized Differentially Modulated Hybrid AF/DF Cooperation Dispensing with Channel Estimation
    Distributed Channel Coding
    Multiple Source Cooperation
    Synchronous versus Asynchronous Cooperative Systems

Primary Audience
Whilst this overview is ambitious in terms of providing a research-oriented outlook, potential attendees require only a modest background in wireless networking and communications. The mathematical contents are kept to a minimum and a conceptual approach if adopted. Postgraduate students, researchers and signal processing practitioners as well as managers looking for cross-pollination of their experince with other topics may find the coverage of the presentation beneficial. The participants will receive the set of slides as supporting material and they may find the detailed mathematical analysis in the above-mentioned books.

Novelty

Biography

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T4: Cognitive Radio and Software Defined Radio
Presented by: Huseyin Arslan (U. South Florida)
Time: 13:30–17:00
Room: TBA

 

Abstract
Today's wireless services and systems have come a long way since the rollout of the conventional voice-centric cellular systems. The demand for wireless access in voice and multi-media applications has been increasing. As a result of the convergence of computing, content, and entertainment with communication, the radio equipment have become part of our daily lives. It came to a point where we cannot live without them anymore. We cannot interact, chat, find our direction, have fun or sometimes even think without them. We can leave everything behind, but, cannot go anywhere without them. The fun is actually just starting. Wait until when you see the intelligence is added to these radios. Equipped with the capability and flexibility of software defined radios and combined with the machine learning a new concept which is referred as Cognitive Radio (CR) has emerged in the wireless world. This tutorial targets to discuss the cognitive radio, software defined radio, and adaptive radio concepts from several aspects. Adaptive resource management, adaptive transmission technologies and receiver adaptations techniques for the evolution of wireless communication systems will be reviewed. The enabling techniques for these adaptations that requires sensing and measurements of some radio and interference parameters, like Doppler spread estimation, link quality estimation, signal-to-noise ratio estimation, interference temperature measurement, post-processing channel quality estimations (CRC estimation, Bit-error-rate estimation, frame erasure rate estimation) etc., will be covered.

Tutorial Objectives
Understand the basics of CR and various definitions/interpretations of CR
Find out the relation between CR, cognitive networks, SDR, and adaptive radio
Understand some applications of CR, challenges in CR, and some of the CR standards

Tutorial Outline

    Future Trends in wireless
      Requirements
      Applications
      Core technologies
    Introduction to Cognitive Radio, Adaptive Radio, and SDR
      Definitions
      Relations with the evolution of wireless systems
      Applications
      Challenges
      Standards
    Some Critical Applications of Cognitive radio
      White Space Radio
      ISM band
      Public Safety
      4G and Beyond
      Femtocells
    Challenges and Research Problems in Cognitive Radio
      Awareness
      CR & SDR measurements
      Spectrum fragmentation and carrier aggregation

Primary Audience
This tutorial is intended for technical professionals in the communications industry, technical managers, and researchers in both academia and industry. Therefore, the key audience for the tutorial is: graduate students (Master or PhD), postdoctoral scholars, researchers, faculty members, scientists, and engineers in academia as well as in the public and private sectors in the broad area of wireless telecommunications.

Novelty
Cognitive radio research has been gaining a lot of interest lately. The social, economical, and environmental impact of cognitive radios are expected to be significant. There are several opportunities for research and development in this area. Also, CR has applications in various wireless networks.

Biography

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T5: Stochastic Geometry and Random Graphs for the Modeling, Analysis, and Design of Wireless Networks
Presented by: Martin Haenggi (University of Notre Dame)
Time: 09:00–12:30
Room: TBA

 

Abstract
Modern wireless systems are increasingly interference-limited. To get an analytical handle on the interference, a model is needed for the spatial distribution of the nodes.
This tutorial is about such spatial models and their use in wireless networks. It presents the techniques to average network performance over all likely network realizations, which yields general results that permit a fair comparison of different architectures and protocols. Applications include ad hoc, sensor, cellular, vehicular, and cognitive networks.

Tutorial Objectives
Recognize the need of spatial modeling of wireless networks
Understand the most relevant techniques from stochastic geometry and their applications to wireless networks
Read and understand research articles on the topic
Apply spatial models and the analytical tools in their own work and make original contributions

Tutorial Outline

    Introduction and motivation. Need for spatial modeling.
    Modeling of wireless networks using stochastic point processes
    The Poisson point process and basic techniques
    Interference characterization and outage
    Interference correlation, transmission delay, and effect of mobility
    Practical impact on ad hoc, cognitive, cellular, and sensor networks
    Conclusions and outlook

Primary Audience
The main target groups are:
1. Professors, researchers, and graduate students with an interest in wireless network modeling, analysis, and design
2. Engineers who are interested in a novel approach to modeling, simulation, and analysis of cognitive, ad hoc, mesh, sensor, and cellular systems.

The only prerequisite is a background in probability.

Novelty
Cellular systems are becoming increasingly decentralized and irregular with the advent of relays, mini-base stations, and femtocells. Vehicular networks are also subject to considerable uncertainty due to continuous mobility, as are cognitive systems.
It is thus critical that spatial models of the node locations be developed, understood, and applied.

Biography
Martin Haenggi is a Professor of Electrical Engineering and a Concurrent Professor of Applied Mathematics and Statistics at the University of Notre Dame. Over the last decade, he has conducted extensive research on the use of stochastic geometry for the analysis and design of wireless systems and published two books and over a 100 journal and conference articles on this subject. For one of the papers, he received the 2010 IEEE Communication Society Best Tutorial Paper Award.

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T6: Cross-Layer Design for Spectrum- and Energy-Efficient Wireless Networks
Presented by: Guowang Miao (KTH) and Jens Zander (KTH)
Time: 13:30–17:00
Room: TBA

 

Abstract
This tutorial introduces cross-layer technologies to improve both spectral and energy efficiencies from different perspectives of wireless networks. We will first discuss the basic wireless channel properties and the methodologies needed to enable high-performance wireless networks. Then we introduce state-of-art spectral and energy efficient communication technologies for both individual- and multi-user networks. To be more specific, our treatment will cover not only centralized wireless networks like cellular access networks, but also distributed ones like ad hoc and sensor networks. We will discuss in detail the relation between SE and EE in different types of wireless networks and introduce new guidelines that will significantly improve SE and EE for future network design.

Tutorial Objectives
Understand what MAC-PHY joint cross-layer design is.
What are centralized and distributed spectrum-efficient resource managements and what are the optimal ways to achieve it.
What is energy-efficient wireless communications.
What is the tradeoff between spectral and energy efficiency.
What is energy-efficient network design.
What is energy-efficient wireless resource management.

Tutorial Outline

    Introduction
      Motivation
      Challenges and Opportunities
      Methodologies
    Wireless channel properties
      Single-user perspective
      Multi-user perspective
    Basic Concepts
      Wireless PHY Layer
      Fundamental wireless resources
      Medium access control for wireless resource management
    Cross-Layer Optimization for Spectral Efficiency Improvement
      Spectral-efficient adaptive link transmission
      Centralized adaptive spectral-efficient medium access control
      Distributed adaptive spectral-efficient medium access control
    Cross-Layer Optimization for Energy Efficiency Improvement
      Energy efficient adaptive link transmission
      Centralized adaptive energy-efficient medium access control
      Distributed adaptive energy-efficient medium access control
    Energy-Efficient Design in Mobile Access Networks
      Network Energy Consumption Analysis
      Fundamental Tradeoffs in Access Network Design
      Energy-Efficient Network Deployment
      Energy-Efficient Dynamic Base Station Sleeping

Primary Audience
Graduate students, faculty members, practicing engineers, and researchers who are interested in understanding and doing research in wireless communications and related topics, particularly those who desire the design of both spectral- and energy-efficient wireless systems.

Novelty
Both spectral and energy efficiencies are becoming increasingly important because of the explosive demand of data traffic. They are two different metrics. Some design criteria optimized for improving one metric may not necessarily improve the other. We can see there is an urgent need to address SE and EE in a joint way.

Biography

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T7: Voice over LTE by K. Daniel Wong (Daniel Wireless LLC, Palo Alto), Vijay Varma (Applied Comm. Sciences, Red Bank, NJ) has been cancelled

 

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T8: V2V Safety Communications: An Overview and Examination of Technical Challenges by John B. Kenney and Gaurav Bansal (Toyota InfoTechnology Center) has been cancelled

 

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T9: Economic modeling for novel spectrum management approaches: secondary markets and private commons by Luis Guijarro (Universitat Politecnica de Valencia, Spain) has been cancelled

 

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